Tag Archives: Social Security

‘La grossesse’ in Grenoble – part 3, “tapering off”

The shape of things to come!

In the third and final part of her blog about being an expecting mother in France, Shonah Wraith describes the last three months of her pregnancy. Continue reading ‘La grossesse’ in Grenoble – part 3, “tapering off”

‘La grossesse’ in Grenoble – part 2, “in full training”

An ultrasound scan. Photo: j.dopf

In the second part of a blog about her experience as an expecting mother in France, Grenoble Life’s Shonah Wraith describes her second trimester. Continue reading ‘La grossesse’ in Grenoble – part 2, “in full training”

Starting your own business in France

URSSAF - another elegant French acronym

Patrick Owen shares his experience starting an English teaching business, becoming an Auto-entrepreneur and dealing with France’s particular administrative complexity and love of acronyms. Continue reading Starting your own business in France

‘Open to interpretation’ – an interview with Benjamin Penin

Ben interpreting for Anand Gokani (great grandson of Mahatma Ghandi)
Ben interpreting for Anand Gokani (great grandson of Mahatma Gandhi)

 

Benjamin Penin swapped sunny Manchester for downtown Grenoble in 2002 to pursue his dreams of living in the Alps and becoming a freelance translator.  Grenoble Life wanted to find out more … Continue reading ‘Open to interpretation’ — an interview with Benjamin Penin

No cure for the common cold? Healthcare in Grenoble

No cure for the common cold
No cure for the common cold? Try telling the French

The last time the World Health Organisation published a league table of the world’s best healthcare systems, France came top. That this was in 2000, and that WHO no longer compiles this type of ranking should not dissuade you from the fact that you are in pretty safe hands when living in France (the UK having pulled in at a respectable 18th, ahead of Germany, Belgium and Sweden – impressively – and way ahead of the US in 37th place). Without getting too bogged down in the parameters of such a study, I can only give some personal examples of the ways in which the part-private, part-public French system compares with the much-embattled (and probably not nearly as bad as everyone says it is) UK National Health System.

The large social security contributions made by employees (around 20 per cent of income, taken at source) and their employers (roughly a further 60 per cent) have helped finance a system that covers most – but not all – of the cost of healthcare through a reimbursement system: sometimes involving paperwork, but fairly benign by the standards of French bureaucracy. The other part in theory must be covered by the patient, but many, like me, opt to buy additional insurance, known as a ‘Mutuelle’, which is offered by different organisations and varies in cost. Normally paid monthly, mine – with the MGEN – costs around 30 euros a month but ensures total cover in all almost all cases. A more comprehensive overview of the system can be found here and here. Continue reading No cure for the common cold? Healthcare in Grenoble